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Window Or Aisle? What Your Choice Says About You

By Leah Freeman-Haskin

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Window seat or aisle seat? Every traveler seems to have their preference, and every traveler is convinced that they are on the right side of the argument. It’s a debate that is possibly more contentious than the 2016 election, and both sides have important pros and cons to consider. But outside of just a preference of comfort, does your choice actually reveal the depths of your inner personality? Some seem to think so.

For those who opt for the window seat, it’s often the view as well as the option of having a wall to rest up against that wins them over. If you are in a window seat, you will also never be disturbed by the other passengers who need to use the restroom. For some, this awkward and often fumbling interaction is enough to swear them off of aisle seats for good. 

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On the other hand, the aisle seat offers more freedom to come and go without disturbing other passengers. You also have a tad more space to stretch your legs if you chose to venture into a the aisle a bit. The cons? Inevitably you will be asked to get up at least a few times during longer flights to make room for passengers to use the restroom. You also run into the potential of getting struck by the service cart if you opt to stretch out into the aisle. 

With the pros and cons being very clear to seasoned travelers, it’s no surprise that everyone has a solid preference on the matter. 

Dr. Becky Spelman, chief psychologist at Harley Street’s Private Therapy Clinic tells Telegraph Travel,  “Passengers who favor the window seat like to be in control, tend to take an ‘every man for themselves’ attitude towards life, and are often more easily irritable. They also like to ‘nest’ and prefer to exist in their own bubble.”

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And for our aisle-loving travelers? “Aisle passengers are often more sociable and definitely more amenable as people. They are also more likely to be restless flyers and less adept at sleeping on planes,” says behavioral psychologist Jo Hemmings.

So, which side falls into the majority? According to a study conducted by Expedia in 2014, 55 percent of their customers chose the window, versus 45 percent who opted for the aisle. With no clear-cut winner in place, we can at least say that no one is vying for the center seat and the debate will continue to divide travelers everywhere for years to come.

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