Home

Trump Administration Considers Adding Nigeria, Eritrea, Tanzania To Travel Ban

By Parker Diakite

Share

Three years after issuing a controversial ban on seven Muslim-majority countries, the Trump administration is planning to expand the ban to four additional African countries, including Nigeria, Sudan, Tanzania, and Eritrea. 

Trump confirmed that he is trying to add additional nations to the travel ban during an interview with The Wall Street Journal but declined to list the countries. 

A draft being considered by the Trump administration would place immigration restrictions on seven countries in total but wouldn’t necessarily completely ban all citizens of those nations from entering the United States.

For instance, the restrictions could apply only to certain government officials or issue shorter-term visas.

Why now?

While officials from the White House have not confirmed which countries would be a part of that ban, there is some speculation on at least two of the countries.

Nigeria has been faced with scrutiny from the current administration as the country accounts for the third-highest number of US visa overstays. As a result, the Trump administration has become tougher on Africa’s largest economy.

After suspending its visa interview waiver indefinitely for Nigerian applicants (the waiver allowed frequent travelers to renew their visa without going through in-person interviews each time), the US also raised visa fees by including additional “reciprocity fees” ranging from $80 to $303, as reported in Quartz.

Sudan was one of the Muslim-majority countries initially named in the controversial Jan. 2017 travel ban but was eventually removed following legal disputes in federal court.

The White House Responds

White House spokesman, Hogan Gidley, declined to confirm any details about plans to expand the travel ban but defended the original order in a statement to Politico:

“The travel ban has been profoundly successful in protecting our country and raising the security baseline around the world,” he said. “While there are no new announcements at this time, common sense and national security both dictate that if a country wants to fully participate in U.S. immigration programs, they should also comply with all security and counter-terrorism measures — because we do not want to import terrorism or any other national security threat into the United States.”

Share
Travel Noire

Parker Diakite

Want more?

Get exclusive, unpublished tips from Travel Noire's CEO to help you get off the beaten path, into the hearts of locals and onto a better, more cultured life.

These Are The Cheapest Places To Travel In March

These Are The Cheapest Places To Travel In March

March is that time of year where people are thinking about a vacation but apprehensive as it is the end of the winter season in many destinations. It’s a low season for travel, which is good news for travelers, as flight prices are significantly lower compared to the rest of the year. From France, Guyana, […]

Parker Diakite

How This Black Travel Influencer Is Helping Others Connect With  Their Roots In Africa

How This Black Travel Influencer Is Helping Others Connect With Their Roots In Africa

Rashad McCrorey’s passion for social justice and traveling is what inspired him to create Africa Cross Culture, a travel company that has allowed him to help more than 100 African Americans reconnect with their roots. Raised in Harlem, NY, McCrorey is committed to leading the resurgence of African American travelers back to Africa. “Some people […]

Parker Diakite

Health Officials Brace For Coronavirus In Africa

Health Officials Brace For Coronavirus In Africa

With more than 70,000 confirmed cases of Coronavirus and over 1,800 deaths, the World Health Organization (WHO) recently declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern due to the lack of scientific knowledge about the virus as well as increasing preparation in vulnerable countries. 29 countries have reported cases, including in Egypt – the first […]

Parker Diakite