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Hilton Creates Heritage Guides To Help Travelers Celebrate Black History All Year Long

By DeAnna Taylor

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While Black History Month may have come to an end, Hilton has created a way for travelers to continue celebrating historical moments in Black history year round.

The brand just launched a set of heritage guides in some of the most popular cities across the country. The guides show where to find historical landmarks, museums, and activities dedicated to Black history. They even map out Hilton properties in close proximity to these places as well.

Here are a few of the guides that you can find via Hilton’s newsroom:

Charleston, SC

African Americans have shaped Charleston’s history and culture, leaving a legacy that persists today. From the first slave ship’s arrival at Sullivan’s Island to the Civil War’s start at Fort Sumter, the city offers a glimpse into America’s past through sites like the Old Slave Mart Museum and nearby Mitchelville, the country’s first freedmen’s community. The Homewood Suites by Hilton Charleston Historic District provides easy access to King Street, which is home to some of Charleston’s best boutiques, restaurants and bars.

New York, NY

New York City has played a pivotal role in black history, from the enslaved men that built the city under Dutch rule to the 1920s Harlem Renaissance. Today, the city offers countless ways to learn about black culture. Take a Heritage Tour through Harlem, or head south to reflect at North America’s oldest and largest excavated burial ground at the African Burial Ground National Monument. Visitors can easily access notable locations from The Bernic Hotel New York City, Tapestry Collection by Hilton, a boutique hotel in midtown near Rockefeller Center, Times Square and the Chrysler Building.

Washington, D.C.

The nation’s capital is home to major milestones in African American history, from the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 to the March on Washington a century later. Visitors can explore centuries of history at the Frederick Douglass HouseMartin Luther King Jr. Memorial and National Museum of African American History and Culture. These sites and more are accessible from the Hilton Garden Inn Washington D.C. Downtown, located within 2 miles of the U.S. Capitol, White House and Smithsonian museums.

To see the entire list of destinations, you can check them out here.

Related: Meet The Man Who Launched ‘Black History Before Slavery’ Tours In Africa

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DeAnna Taylor

DeAnna Taylor is a criminal defense Attorney turned travel blogger, author, and writer. While Charlotte, NC (her hometown) is her base, she's always somewhere on a plane. Catch her on IG: @brokeandabroadlife.

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