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This Detroit-Based Festival Received Backlash After Charging White Attendees $10 More Than Blacks

By DeAnna Taylor

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Afrofuturist Fest, a festival based in Detroit, is in the hot seat after doing things a little… different.

You see the festival, which takes places on August 3, decided to charge people of color only $10, while charging all others $20. Yes, there was a fee for not being a person of color.

Event creators explained that the reason for the price difference was because white people can afford tickets to any event in any city, while black and brown people cannot.

“This cycle disproportionately displaces black and brown people from enjoying entertainment in their own communities,” the group said on Eventbrite.

The event, which was being advertised through an Eventbrite page, set an early bird fee with those stipulations. News of the upcharge quickly hit social media platforms and even caused a performer to pull out of the event.

“A non-POC friend of mine brought to my attention that AfroFuture is requiring non-people-of-color to pay twice the amount to attend the festival as POC,” Rapper Tiny Jag tweeted on July 2. “This does not reflect the views of myself or the Tiny Jag team. I will not be playing this show. I apologize for anyone who may have been triggered or offended.”


Of course, this information also spread to Eventbrite, who then issued their own statement.

“In this case, we have notified the creator of the event about this violation and requested that they alter their event accordingly,” their statement read. “We have offered them the opportunity to do this on their own accord; should they not wish to comply we will unpublish the event completely from our site.”

As of Sunday, the group had changed their decision to charge non-people of color the additional $10 after receiving threats for their initial decision.

It seems that the event itself will still go on as planned. The all-day fest is said to be Essence Fest meets Afropunk. The day is set to have a parade, drum circles, and several music performances as well. It is also described as a 360 transformative dreamscape centering Detroit’s Black magic performers and artisans with the community.

Related:Black Woman Gives Up Seat On A Flight After White Passenger Refuses To Sit Next To Her

 

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DeAnna Taylor

DeAnna Taylor is a criminal defense Attorney turned travel blogger, author, and writer. While Charlotte, NC (her hometown) is her base, she's always somewhere on a plane. Catch her on IG: @brokeandabroadlife.

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